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Take Our Daughters & Sons to Work Day

The NUANCE Center loves inspiring young minds and takes pride in the part it plays in “Take Our Daughters & Sons to Work Day.” This year, about 30 students from elementary to middle school visited the NUANCE Center on Thurs., April 28, and learned about electron microscopes. 

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The NUANCE Center introduced about 30 students from elementary school to high school to nanotechnology for “Take Our Daughters & Sons to Work Day” on Thurs., April 28.

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NUANCE Center outreach coordinator Raymond Bailey defined atoms as “very small particles” to the room of children.

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The young audience members listened attentively to the presentation.

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Microscopy & imaging specialist Eric Miller explained to students how electron microscopes work and aid scientists in their research. 

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Microscopy & imaging specialist Eric Miller showed the students a close-up view of a moth’s wing through the Hitachi S-3400N-II Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM).

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Students waited expectantly for the next sample to be placed under the microscope.

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Microscopy & imaging specialist Eric Miller showed the students what appeared to be dirty tape but was actually part of a moth’s antenna.

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Research assistant professor and TEM manager Dr. Jinsong Wu explained the difference between an optical microscope and an electron microscope. 

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Dr. Jinsong Wu demonstrated how to use the JEOL JEM-2100 Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM).

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Students took turns trying out the JEOL JEM-2100 Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM).

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Students took turns using the JEOL JEM-2100 Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM).

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Two students sat next to each other while listening to electron microscopist and SEM manager Karl Hagglund’s presentation.

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SEM manager Karl Hagglund constructed a nanoscale picture of Mundelein High School’s mascot.

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SEM manager Karl Hagglund answered the students’ questions.

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SEM manager Karl Hagglund demonstrated a nanoscale picture of a Dilbert cartoon he had constructed with the FI Helios Nanolab Focused Ion Beam (FIB) Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM).